Driver Training: Fatigue and Wellness Awareness

Your driver will learn how to manage fatigue and wellness while driving. The following topics are covered.

What Will Happen in This Unit?

Your driver will learn:

What Will Happen in This Unit?

All three lessons in this unit will take place online.

Student Aids:

To help you learn the material in this unit, the following items have been included in your student material.

Hours Of Service: Drowsy Driving As Dangerous As Drunk Driving

Drinking alcohol and then driving is very dangerous and a serious problem. People who drink alcohol are involved in traffic accidents resulting in over 20,000 deaths every year. Alcohol impairs muscle coordination, reaction time, depth perception, and night vision.

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Hours of Service: Staying Alert And Fit To Drive

Driving a vehicle for long hours is tiring. Even the best of drivers will become less alert. However, there are things that good drivers do to help stay alert and safe.

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Hours Of Service: Tracy Morgan Accident

Need

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Student Driver Training Toolbox

This course is included in the Student Driver Training Toolbox. What is the Student Driver Training Toolbox? A box of tools to run your training program your way, with maximum efficiency. You can now track every aspect of student training electronically. Who can benefit from this system? Truck driving schools, delivery companies, bus lines, carriers, municipalities...any company that trains drivers.

Trucking Companies should use the service that we built for them:

Safety as a Service, online driver training and recruiting. Same courses-different tools.

Tip

Be sure to get an adequate amount of sleep each night. If possible, do not drive while your body is naturally drowsy, between the hours of 12 a.m. to 6 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Driver drowsiness may impair a driver's response time to potential hazards, increasing the chances of being in a crash.16 If you do become drowsy while driving, be sure to choose a safe place to pull over and rest.

Did You Know? The circadian rhythm refers to the wake/sleep cycle that our body goes through each day and night. The cycle involves our internal clock and controls the daily pattern of alertness in a human body. With inadequate sleep, the drowsiness experienced during natural "lulls" can be even stronger and may have a greater adverse effect on a driver's performance and alertness.

Did You Know? A study by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) found that driver alertness was related to "time-of-day" more so than "time-on-task."48 Most people are less alert at night, especially after midnight. This drowsiness may be enhanced if you have been on the road for an extended period of time.

Did You Know? A recent study conducted to determine the risk of having a safety-critical event as a function of driving-hour suggests that incidents are highest during the first hour of driving. The authors hypothesize that drivers may be affected by sleep inertia shortly after waking from sleep. This may be especially true for drivers who sleep in the sleeper berth.49 Sleep inertia refers to impairment in a variety of performance tasks, including short-term memory, vigilance, cognitive functioning, reaction time, and ability to resist sleep.

TIP:

Recognize the Signals and Dangers of Drowsiness

Pay attention: Indicators of drowsiness include: frequent yawning, heavy eyes, and blurred vision.

Did You Know? Research has indicated that being awake for 18 hours is comparable to having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent, which is legally intoxicated and leaves you at equal risk for a crash.

Did You Know? A 2005 study suggests that three out of every four CMV drivers report having experienced at least one type of driving error as a result of drowsiness.58

Thought Scenario

Instructions

We have a description of brief a period in the life of a young truck driver. Read the scenario. Then read the questions below and think about your answers.

Things to Think About:

SCENARIO

Jim Riley is a new driver at Brown Trucking Company. He has already completed a couple of long sleeper runs and likes his job.

Jim knew he was scheduled for a long haul to Buffalo tomorrow, not a pleasant prospect in January. It meant a layover, and he might have to deadhead to Cleveland to get a return load.

Jim also liked to party. He promised himself that he wouldn't stay out too late. But the party didn't end till well past midnight. He drank a lot of beer. Didn't get too drunk, but sure felt the effects.

Getting up at 7 a.m. was tough. But he made it to the terminal on time. The dispatcher was busy and didn't notice that Jim appeared a little fuzzy. After the routine in the yard, Jim got on the road by 8:30 a.m. He knew he had done a better job of pre-trip in the past and made a mental note to give the vehicle a better going over at the first rest stop. Except for Route 35 at the beginning of the trip, the rest of the route was not familiar to him. He hadn't had time to really go over the instructions and would look at them later. He remembers the dispatcher mentioned something about a detour and bad weather (possibly snow or sleet) ahead. So he turned on the radio full blast to get the weather and listen to music. It would help keep him awake too.

What was needed now was coffee. Chet's Diner was a great place to stop and was just outside of town before Route 35. It would put him a little behind schedule, but the cops were never around on that first stretch of Route 35. Traffic always moved a little faster, so he would make up some of the lost time.

Jim felt a little better now. Traffic was picking up and he pushed along right behind a small import. "C'mon. Get over in the right lane," he thought, "I don't want to spend all day getting to the diner."

He turned off the radio and flipped on the CB. He paid a lot of attention to that CB trying to get up chatter with some other drivers and maybe some company at the diner. The clouds darkened as he passed the time with another CB'er. Jim thought, "Only 15 more minutes to Chet's Diner."

Student Driver Training Toolbox

driver-training

The course below is from the catalog. View the other courses in the online library.

This course is included in the Student Driver Training Toolbox. What is the Student Driver Training Toolbox? A box of tools to run your training program your way, with maximum efficiency. You can now track every aspect of student training electronically. Who can benefit from this system? Truck driving schools, delivery companies, bus lines, carriers, municipalities...any company that trains drivers.

Trucking Companies

Should use the service that we built for them: Safety as a Service, online driver training and recruiting. Same courses-different tools.

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